Las Vegas Market: Expanded home decor offerings excite buyers

Buyers of home accessories seem to have hit the jackpot in Las Vegas this week. Floors and showrooms are running over with new and returning exhibitors of accents, lighting, rugs, wall décor, mirrors, soft goods, tabletop, accent furniture and other jewelry for the home. Home Accents Today spoke with some of the retailers and buyers shopping at World Market Center Monday, many of whom were downright energized by all the new offerings, the positive market climate, and the retail business in general.

Written By Susan Dickenson — Home Accents Today

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Is collaborative office design hurting workplace productivity?

The trendy theory in office design is that open, cubicle-less workspaces foster a creative, collaborative workplace. One survey found that 77 percent of respondents have or are planning to implement an open-office design. But what is this office design doing to productivity?

In a new survey from Gensler, the global design and architecture firm found that some offices are going too far with the open concept and it’s hurting productivity, with only one in four knowledge workers in the United States working in optimal workplace environments.

What exactly is the optimal design? In analyzing the survey, Gensler determined that the optimal workplace, while focusing on collaboration with an open design, also balances openness with spaces that help workers focus.

Written By Tyler Falk

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Career: Interior Designer

“A Day in the life of a Interior Designer
An interior designer is responsible for the interior design, decoration, and functionality of a client’s space, whether the space is commercial, industrial, or residential. Interior designers work closely with architects and clients to determine the structure of a space, the needs of the occupants, and the style that best suits both. The position is a combination of engineer and artist, and it takes a unique type of mind to handle both of those concepts well. Interior designers have to be good with more than color, fabric, and furniture; interior designers must know materials, have budgeting skills, communicate well, and oversee the ordering, installation, and maintenance of all objects that define a space. They also have to know about electrical capacity, safety, and construction. This broader range of required knowledge distinguishes them from interior decorators. Interior designers have to be able to work with contractors and clients alike, planning and implementing all aesthetic and functional decisions, from faucet handles to miles of carpeting —and all this usually must be done within a fixed budget. Interior designers are hired for their expertise in a variety of styles and approaches, not merely their own personal vision. Therefore, they have to be able to balance their own tastes and their clients’ tastes—and be willing to put their clients’ tastes first. This requirement can be frustrating at first for many who enter the profession. Interior designers are often asked to begin their planning before construction of a space is finished; this means that they must be good at scheduling and comfortable reading blueprints. This element of the job comes as a surprise to many new interior designers, who expect to have less of an administrative and technical role and more of a role in influencing the overall feel and appearance of a space. Those who thrive in the industry say this ability to balance the practical with the aesthetic is crucial to being a successful interior designer. Interior design is hard work, but those who do it well find the work very satisfying.”

Written by The Princeton Review

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What is Interior Design?

“Interior design is a profession that combines creativity, technical knowledge, and business skills. Interior designers work with clients and other design professionals to develop design solutions that are safe, functional, attractive, and meet the needs of the people using the space.

Interior designers must know how to plan a space and how to present that plan visually so that it can be communicated to the client. They must also know about the materials and products that will be used to create and furnish the space, and how texture, color, lighting and other factors combine and interact to make the space come together. In addition, interior designers must understand the structural requirements of their plans, the health and safety issues, building codes, and many other technical aspects. ”

Written by New York School of Interior Design

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